Responsive Web Design – It’s Here To Stay

Responsive Web Design – It’s Here To Stay

We’re asked quite often about mobile strategy, compatibility issues, its affect on SEO and more. We’ve been producing Responsive websites since 2013 but thought this article, written exclusively for JB Systems by Ivan Serrano, would bolster our approach and provide some clarity. We hope you enjoy – and thanks to Ivan for providing some third party, unbiased, insight:

Responsive Design – A Summary
The rise of smartphones and tablets has had a huge impact on the design and user experience of a site. Before mobile devices, brands only needed ensure that their site would work across different browsers. Smartphones and tablets, however, offer a completely different experience from a standard desktop. Not only is the screen smaller the mobile devices themselves generally are less powerful, have different resolutions, rely on touch control and generally do not support Flash. More importantly 75 percent of consumers expect brands to have mobile-friendly sites and have no problem navigating away if they cannot find what they are looking for quickly. With mobile Internet usage growing 73 percent from the previous year, it’s no exaggeration to say that mobile is the most important avenue for marketers. While there are several options to making your site mobile-friendly, the preferred method is to implement a responsive design.

What Is Responsive Web Design?
Simply put, responsive web design (RWD) means all content, images and structure of a site will adjust to fit every screen size. Unlike a mobile specific site, an RWD site is built on one domain and a single HTML codebase which is fluidly resized by CSS to adjust to any screen size. Since it is all built on one domain you don’t need to maintain different versions of the site (more…)

Another Security Breach in the World of WordPress

wp_security_141210275505_640x360According to Search Engine Journal, see it HERE, over 100,000 WordPress sites have been infected due to a Russian malware attack called SoakSoak. Now, to be fair, this isn’t an attack on the WordPress site itself, rather a plugin for the site called RevSlider that is used in many of the WordPress themes. But you already know enough not to use plugins – right? Unfortunately, this plugin is buried so deep in some of the most popular WordPress templates, users wouldn’t know they are using them.
The not-so-much-talked-about issue is that over 11,000 of these sites have been blacklisted by Google already. So what does this mean for Search Engine Optimization (SEO)?

In a previous post, we had discussed the security vulnerabilities in plug-in based template sites and the latest malware attack is a perfect example. The problem: many of these plug-ins are not easy to update and leaves not just the plug-in but the whole website in jeopardy. Each plug-in (and there are literally hundreds) can be developed by a different business or individual who is responsible for monitoring security threats and creating fixes. If your website “solution” relies on 4 different plugins (not uncommon) that translates into a lot of potential issues (more…)

Tips for Writing Better Email Subject Lines

Increasing open rates of your emails is a goal of nearly every email marketer, right? And what’s the biggest key to getting more people to open your email? The subject line! So what makes a successful subject line? Here are a few quick hints that might help.

Note: Don’t forget to test! Try sending the same email with a different subject line and see if you get a better (or worse) open rate. Each audience is different, so it’s important to test to know what works for your readers. (more…)

What happens when Google updates its algorithm?

What happens when Google updates its algorithm?

Over the last several years, Google has updated their algorithm that determines how your website ranks on their search results pages. What we’ve learned through all of these updates is that Google is trying to provide the most relevant results to what you’re searching for. The definition of relevance, however, has evolved over time.

Relevance in Search Engines

Relevance used to mean that you had the most backlinks and popularity among other sites. Then people started using money to gain popularity, trying to beat the system. Google’s response: Google Panda Update.

Relevance used to mean that your site had a dense amount of specific keywords in it. Then people started hiding text and stuffing keywords wherever they could to trick Google into ranking them first. Google’s response: Google Penguin Update.

Well, today, Google has pretty much manhandled every trick in the book and the only way to have long-term success in search engine marketing is (more…)

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